Tag Archives: FocusOn

3 Ways To Beat Procrastination and Lack of Focus

Get more productivity for your time with these apps and tools that help beat procrastination and lack of focus.

First – This is sooo simple but effective developed around a simple kitchen timer that was built into a whole technique – The Pomodoro Technique, to keep you focused and productive.

Wikipedia describes the underlying principles as thus:

There are six stages in the technique:

  1. Decide on the task to be done.
  2. Set the pomodoro timer to n minutes (traditionally n = 25).[1]
  3. Work on the task until the timer rings. If a distraction pops into your head, write it down, but immediately get back on task.
  4. After the timer rings, put a checkmark on a piece of paper.[7]
  5. If you have fewer than four checkmarks, take a short break (3–5 minutes), then go to step 1.
  6. Else (i.e. after four pomodoros) take a longer break (15–30 minutes), reset your checkmark count to zero, then go to step 1.

The stages of planning, tracking, recording, processing and visualizing are fundamental to the technique. In the planning phase tasks are prioritized by recording them in a “To Do Today” list. This enables users to estimate the effort tasks require. As pomodoros are completed, they are recorded, adding to a sense of accomplishment and providing raw data for subsequent self-observation and improvement.[1]

For the purposes of the technique, a pomodoro is the interval of time spent working.[1] After task completion, any time remaining in the pomodoro is devoted to overlearning. Regular breaks are taken, aiding assimilation. A short (3–5 minutes) rest separates consecutive pomodoros. Four pomodoros form a set. A longer (15–30 minute) rest is taken between sets.[1][8]

A goal of the technique is to reduce the impact of internal and external interruptions on focus and flow. A pomodoro is indivisible. When interrupted during a pomodoro, either the other activity must be recorded and postponed (inform – negotiate – schedule – call back) or the pomodoro must be abandoned.[1][8][9]

Source via Wikipedia

Find out more about this technique below and let me know what you think.

 

Jett Farrell-Vega over at The Write Life shared a few more apps for productivity.

Block distractions

Writing often feels like creating something out of nothing. It can be easy to just click over to Facebook and never return. Enter distraction blockers.

For Android, FocusON is a true example of the nuclear option for blocking access to apps and websites. It’s hard — I mean really hard — to shut it off once you’ve enabled a block for a certain period of time.

For Chrome, TimeWarp is a customizable option. It requires some discipline, but the option to divert to a different website or an inspirational quote might be all the motivation you need.

Other popular distraction-blockers include Self Control (Mac), StayFocused (Chrome), and FocusLock (Android).

Get organized

Trello has quickly become my favorite writing tool that most writers have never heard of.

It’s a web-based productivity app with a premise very similar to the old school method of using index cards on a cork board. For a writer, the possibilities are endless. You can use a Trello board to make to do lists, prioritize submissions, even to track research.

My favorite use for Trello is as a scene organizer for fiction projects. Make a board to represent your novel, then make lists on that board to represent each chapter. Finally, make cards for individual scenes or story events. It’s very easy to move scenes around.

Being organized can take a huge amount of stress off and allow you to focus on your content.

See more at the Source The Write Life