Tag Archives: Wikipedia

An Essential Tool for Your Success as a Writer

There was a time when one of the most difficult parts of writing was the researching.

Now with the internet and search engines plus another essential online tool for a writer – Wikipedia, research is becoming a breeze.

A master at researching for writing, Dr. Jeffrey Lant,  covers how to use them and why in his extraordinary online course. Find out more at: http://writerssecrets.com/intro

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Everyone can use our work with a few conditionserching,searching,writing,

Wikipedia has taken a cue from the free software community (which includes projects like GNU, Linux and Mozilla Firefox) and has done away with traditional copyright restrictions on our content. Instead, we’ve adopted what is known as a “free content license” (specifically, a choice between the CC-BY-SA and the GFDL): almost all text and composition created by our users is and will always remain free for anyone to copy, modify, and redistribute. We only insist (and our licenses require) that you credit the contributors, state the free license your re-use is under, and that you do not impose new restrictions on the work or on any improvements you make to it. Many of the images, videos, and other media on the site are also under free licenses, or in the public domain. Just check a file’s description page to see its licensing terms.

We care deeply about the quality of our work

Wikipedia has a set of policies and quality control processes. Editors can patrol changes as they happen, monitor specific topics of interest, follow a user’s track of contributions, tag problematic articles for further review, report vandals, discuss the merits of each article with other users, and much more. What are felt to be our best articles are awarded “featured article” status, and problem pages are nominated for deletion. “WikiProjects” focus on improvements to particular topic areas. Really good articles may go into other media and be distributed to schools through Wikipedia 1.0. We care about getting things right, and we never stop thinking about new ways to do so.

We do not expect you to trust us

It is in the nature of an ever-changing work like Wikipedia that, while some articles are of the highest quality of scholarship, others are admittedly complete rubbish. We are fully aware of what it is and what it isn’t. Also, because some articles may contain errors, please do not use Wikipedia to make critical decisions.

Further information: Wikipedia:General disclaimer

We are not alone

Wikipedia is part of a growing movement for free knowledge that is beginning to permeate science and education. The Wikimedia Foundation directly operates eight sister projects to the encyclopedia: Wiktionary (a dictionary and thesaurus),Wikisource (a library of source documents), Wikimedia Commons (a media repository of more than ten million images, videos, and sound files), Wikibooks (a collection of textbooks and manuals), Wikiversity (an interactive learning resource),Wikinews (a citizen journalism news site), Wikiquote (a collection of quotations), andWikispecies (a directory of all forms of life). Like Wikipedia itself, all these projects are freely licensed and open to contributions.

Further information: wmf:Our projects

We’re in it for the long haul

We want Wikipedia to be around at least a hundred years from now, if it does not turn into something even more significant. Everything about Wikipedia is engineered towards that end: our content licensing, our organization and governance, our international focus, our fundraising strategy, our use of open-source software, and our never-ending effort to achieve our vision. We want you to imagine a world in which every single human being can freely share in the sum of all knowledge. That is our commitment—and we want your help

Read more at the source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikipedia:Ten_things_you_may_not_know_about_Wikipedia#Everyone_can_use_our_work_with_a_few_conditions

Wikipedia can be a great tool for learning and researching information. However, as with all reference works, not everything in Wikipedia is accurate, comprehensive, or unbiased. Many of the general rules of thumb for conducting research apply to Wikipedia, including:

  • Always be wary of any one single source (in any medium — web, print, television or radio), or of multiple works that derive from a single source.
  • Where articles have references to external sources (whether online or not) read the references and check whether they really do support what the article says.
  • In most academic institutions Wikipedia, like most encyclopedias and other tertiary sources, is unacceptable as a source for facts in a research paper.

For more on researching on Wikipedia go to the source at: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikipedia:Researching_with_Wikipedia

Find out about Free Images available at:

https://meta.wikimedia.org/wiki/Free_image_resources

How to use tools like Wikipedia to strengthen your writing is all covered in the Writers Secrets Extraordinary Online Course.

From a rich, full and productive life, Dr. Lant now passes on his writing secrets In the Writers Secrets Package Including:

  • Three volumes of his “Writers Secrets” Series
  • 35 video sessions with summaries from his Online Writing Course

Available at:  https://writerssecret.samcart.com/products/writers-secrets-package