Tag Archives: Writing Tips

Writing Cheats #9 You’re a Character

Writers psyche themselves out constantly. Maybe you’re about to write your first book and don’t even think you can call yourself a writer yet. Or, maybe you envy another writer’s style and don’t think you can measure up. Or, maybe you’re feeling so stuck and uninspired lately that you can’t complete your projects.

Whatever it is, it’s time to get over it. It’s zapping your creativity, output, and…your wallet.

It’s time to go outside of yourself a little bit. It’s time to think of yourself as a character. That might sound strange, but it really can help. Just as you would create a character sketch for someone in your books, create a character sketch for yourself as a writer. There are three steps to this:

  1. Invent yourself– Brainstorm who you are as a writer. What you look like, think about, and talk about as a writer. Now brainstorm who you ideally are as a writer. What is your process? What do people say about your work? Where do you work?
  2. Picture yourself– Next, close your eyes and picture yourself writing. See yourself smiling with confidence as you type away. See yourself finishing the piece. See yourself publishing it on Kindle, happy all the while. See the praise rush in as people read the words. Get a very clear picture in mind– create a vision board to really cement the images.
  3. Interview yourself– Finally, interview yourself. Create a list of questions you’d ask any writer you were interested in. Then, answer the questions, honestly and completely. Your answers may surprise you. They will also give you deeper insight into who you are as a writer.

This process helps you come into your own as a writer. It gives you the confidence and assurance you need to produce outstanding work, more quickly.

Writing Cheats # 8 Zippy research is within reach.

Research.

What came to mind when you read that word? How did you feel? What was your body language?

If you’re like many people, you cringed. You made a face and felt a knot in your stomach. That’s because so many of us are taught (and experience) that research has to be this difficult, boring, time-consuming thing.

Okay, maybe it used to be those things, but it doesn’t have to be anymore. This is the best time in history to be a writer. Not only can you publish anything you want to (within reason) on Kindle, but you can access anything you need to make it happen.

You can use Google Earth to visit faraway lands. You can access untold numbers of public domain books. You can Google anything you want to know. You can ask people from all over the world whatever you’d like to ask them. You can find experts to interview on any topic, with a few clicks of the mouse.

Everything you need is out there and it’s easily accessible. You just have to know how to find it and organize it. Sometimes, having too much information can be just as scary as not having enough.

Here are three tips you need to know to take away most of your struggle with research before you write:

  1. Learn how to read only what you need to-This is the biggest trick to research there is. Be very specific with your research and read only what you need to. Use the ctrl+f function to drill down and find specific words and sections. Be very specific with Google and database searches. Don’t waste time taking notes or even reading things you don’t really need to know. You aren’t hoarding information– you’re reading and using only what you need.
  2. Organize your research as you go– Be very specific about what you need to know. Create notes files for specific topics. Organize yourself now and you won’t have to spend hours doing it later. Don’t just have a giant file for a topic-have many smaller, very specific files that you can access in a stress-free way while writing.
  3. Know exactly where to get the best information– Don’t waste time using sources that can’t back themselves up. Look for primary sources and scholarly sources. Use more than one source to verify information.

Scholar.google.com is a great starting place as is books.google.com. Use those databases to spark additional research in the right places. Go to the right spots the first time around and you’ll save yourself a lot of headaches.

“Create an EBook Today. Publish It On Amazon. Profit From It for the Rest of Your Life” Get a FREE Copy CLICK HERE

Writing Cheats #7 Reading is the answer.

It’s impossible to become a good writer if you aren’t an avid reader. There are so many amazing writers out there. Their books will change your life as you’re reading.

Some writers, however, get so caught up in getting their own work out there that they neglect to feed their mind with the words of others.

Right now, you’re studying a book about writing better and writing more efficiently so you can cash in more by writing amazing Kindle books. I’ve given you some great tips so far, but this is absolutely the most important one.

Read. Read. Read. READ.

It’s amazing what happens when you read. Ideas will come to you. You’ll be infinitely more creative. Words will flow easily, and in the perfect order. You’ll be inspired, alive, and changed.

Read fiction and nonfiction. Read spy novels, romance novels, and horror novels. Read historical fiction and nonfiction, biographies and self-help books. Read everything.

Figure out how to get Kindle books from your local library and fill your Kindle with everything you can get your hands on. That is the best writing course on the planet.

“Create an EBook Today. Publish It On Amazon. Profit From It For the Rest Of Your Life!” Get a FREE Copy CLICK HERE

Writing Cheat # 6 – Know exactly what you’re doing, and when.

Do you write haphazardly? I know some writers who “write” all day long. I know some business owners who “work” all day. They’ll claim to spend 16 hour days working or writing and are at their breaking point. They definitely give their blood, sweat, and tears to the craft.

If you’re that type of writer or worker, I want you to look hard at what you’re actually doing.

  • How often do you check your email?
  • How often do you visit news sites?
  • How much time do you spend on Facebook?
  • How often do you find yourself getting into debates on Internet forums?
  • Do you check celebrity gossip sites?
  • Do you find yourself getting up for a drink, to use the bathroom, to get a snack, to check on the cat dozens of times in your work day?
  • Do you find yourself at the end of a work day, wondering what in the world you did all day and why you don’t have more of your project done?

I’ll be the first to say that I work long days. But, my days are pretty tightly focused. I frequently check in on my forum members and my Facebook group members. You’ll rarely find me flittering my days away doing nothing. It takes dedication to get to this point and I won’t say it’s always easy– the Internet is an endlessly distracting place with any number of rabbit holes.

I want you to give yourself a maximum of 3 hours a day to work at your computer over the next three days. That’s it. You’re not allowed to be on your computer, for any reason, longer than three hours.

These 3 challenge hours will include the following activities:

  • Writing
  • Marketing your Kindle books
  • Checking email
  • Spending time checking news outlets, gossip, and funny cat pictures

Yes, you have big projects to complete. You have goals and deadlines.

You still have those goals and deadlines…but you now have much less time to work on them for three days.

Don’t worry– I’ll wager that you’ll get a lot more done than you usually do. There are two things at work here:

  • You naturally work better, faster, and more efficiently when you’re crunched for time. You don’t have 16 hours a day to work during this challenge, so your conscious and subconscious will find ways for you to work smarter.

You’ll neither have the time nor the inclination to check out time wasting sites. You only have 3 hours– those dancing cats aren’t that interesting. You also won’t feel the pull to do something fun while you work so hard because

  • you won’t feel like you’re missing out. You have 21 hours to do whatever else you’d like to do (assuming you don’t have an outside job– even then, your “free” hours truly become your own). Read a book, go for a walk, or watch tons of trashy TV if you want. The rest of the day belongs to you.

Do a self-evaluation after the experiment. Did you get more done than normal? You probably did– working a fraction of the time. Adjust your work day from there and think about what you have to do and what you really want to do. Those low-value time wasting websites are sucking away your productivity and time away from activities you really want to do.

“Create an EBook today. Publish It on Amazon. Profit From It for the Rest of Your Life!” Get a FREE Copy CLICK HERE

Writing Cheats #5 Change where you are.

Writers are creatures of habit. They do the same things the same way. Sometimes, this works well– maybe you have a lucky chair or desk you write in. Sometimes, though, this sameness causes things to go stale– and it shows up in your writing.

If you’re feeling stuck, bland, or uninspired, you need a change of scenery. Here are some ideas of things you can do to jumpstart you physically, mentally, and emotionally:

  • Do something you’ve never done before.
  • Go to the beach and brainstorm or write there.
  • Go to a busy Starbucks or local cafe and write there.
  • Go for a walk through the woods by yourself with no electronics.
  • Take an entire week off with no access to electronics.
  • People watch for an entire afternoon
  • Read something in a genre you’ve never read before
  • Re-read your favorite book from childhood
  • Call someone you haven’t called in a while
  • Apologize to someone you need to apologize to
  • Pay the toll for someone behind you
  • Spend the day on a farm
  • Visit the “poor” section of town
  • Volunteer in a homeless shelter for an afternoon
  • Visit the ritzy section of town
  • Dress up like someone you admire
  • Read about the life of a writer from two centuries ago

… you get the idea. It’s time to break out and do something completely unexpected. You may have heard this advice before, but you likely haven’t seen anything like this list before. One or more of those ideas stood out to you. Now, do them.

You’ll come back to your writing with a new perspective, a new jolt of creativity, and total freedom to write something awesome much more quickly than you would have had you just stared at the blinking cursor for hours on end.

“How To Be a Writer Who Flies High, Makes Money and Dazzles the Folks Back Home” Get Your FREE Copy Click Here

Writing Cheat # 4 Take away all questions before you start

Some writers try to write with only a vague notion of what they are going to write about. That can work for some writers, but you might not be one of them if you struggle with writer’s block, inconsistency, plot holes, and a number of other issues that will sink your Kindle book.

Many writers “interview” their characters before they sit down to write. They pretend to have their characters tell them about their lives, past, present, and future. This is a really great technique, but let’s take it a step further. You are going to ask your characters how they feel about everything that happens in the story.

At this point, you likely have your major plot points figured out. But, every writer has experienced the frustration that comes along when they just don’t know how to move the plot forward or how to solve a plot hole that doesn’t make sense. Stewing about these problems can put a giant kink in the works. It’s almost impossible to move forward if these questions are hovering over you, unanswered.

Here’s what you can do instead– answer these questions ahead of time. No, you can’t predict every question or issue you’ll have. But, you can be way ahead of the game and can be prepared to solve any issue that comes your way.

List the major plot points you have planned. Then, interview every character who will be affected or even present at the time of the event. “Ask” your characters what they saw, who they saw, what they felt, what happened (for them) before and after the major plot point. Remember to do this for each character in turn-even minor ones. This helps you see the plot from all angles so you can plug up any holes. This can be as quick or as detailed as you want to make it.

Now, when you run into questions or aren’t sure what to write next, you can just look at what your characters told you. You’ll never get stuck and your writing will be even more powerful and creative.

You can also do this with non-fiction, to some extent. It depends on your topic and your goal.

“Create and E Book Today. Publish It On Amazon. Profit From It For The Rest Of Your Life!”  Get Your FREE Copy CLICK HERE

Writing Cheats #2 -The backwards outline

You have the end in mind after cheat #1. Found at: http://writerssecrets.com/writing-cheats-1-see-the-end-before-the-beginning/

You know how to create a traditional outline. Now I want you to try something that isn’t as traditional– create a backwards outline.

Outlines usually consist of major talking points and sub points. That’s a great method and works very well for a lot of people. But outlines sometimes become too focused on “me, me, me” the author, instead of on the readers.

Great writers are supposed to pay attention to their audience. They are supposed to be able to reach their audience on an emotional level, delivering on the very thing the reader hoped to gain from reading the book, and more.

Too many writers get bogged down on the mechanics of the outline instead of on the expected outcome of the outline. I hope that makes sense. Emotions, feelings, and the power of words get lost in the mechanics of writing and outlining.

Let’s take a different approach. This approach gets the very best writing out of you while also giving the very best to your reader. Best of all, this method will help you write more quickly and become more excited about your writing.

This exercise is all about emotions and feelings. Go ahead and get a general idea of what each chapter will be about. For fiction, which scenes will each chapter contain? For non-fiction, what information will be in each chapter? This should be a very rough, quick outline with few details-there is plenty of time to fill that out later.

Now that you have your list of chapters and a general idea of what they will contain, it’s time to think about the result of those chapters. When the book is written, what will the reader feel or think after reading chapter one? How about chapter two? Chapter 3? Go through each chapter in turn and use this method of backwards outlining. It’s “backwards” because you’re thinking about desired results and feelings instead of facts, figures, and structure.

Here is a fiction example:

Chapter One

General idea: Princess hates her posh life and wants to escape from the castle.

Reader should feel: Skeptical about this spoiled girl, yet intrigued at the same time because they see a little of themselves in her desire for something more.

Do you see how easy it will now be to fill out the rest of the outline for chapter one? You’ve started with your desired result, which got your brain working with possibilities. Now will take just a few minutes to sketch the details for chapter one. You may have just stared at your outline, baffled, for hours before this trick.

Here is a non-fiction example:

General idea: Writing great books for Kindle is actually easier than most people think.

Reader should feel: Like I understand them. They should feel hope and excitement about learning new methods to write faster and better. Possibly skeptical and unsure, but anxious and excited to move past the first chapter.

Did I capture some of what you felt as you read the first chapter? I hope so– it helped me figure out what to write and which emotional hot points to hit on. It then became very easy to write the introduction.

Do this with each chapter you’re going to write and the book will practically write itself… Partially because you’ve hyper focused on the reader. Everything comes into focus when you do that. It’s so much easier to write and to feel excited about your writing when you do this. No more writer’s block and no more hesitation to sit down and write– I dare say, this method makes it fun to write.

Get a FREE Copy of “Create an EBook today. Publish it on Amazon. Profit from it for the Rest of Your Life!”

Writing Cheats #1-See the End before the Beginning.

Not really cheats but it’s more fun to think of them that way. Really it’s tips and methods for efficiency and ease in writing.

Writing Cheat #1 –  See the end before the beginning.

You’ve been told to create outlines before you get started writing. You’ve been told that this takes away writer’s block and gives you a smooth path as you write. All of that is true…there’s just one problem. Your writer’s block and uncertainty can be so severe that you can’t even get that far. What do you do then? If you’re like most writers, you sit around feeling anxious with your fingers motionlessly poised over the keyboard. You waste minutes, if not hours, with this uncertainty. It zaps your creativity and your best ideas.

This problem (I think we all go through it) got me thinking about what I know about success. Masters of productivity and goal setting tell us to create vision boards, mind movies, and things like that to become more successful. We’re supposed to use these visuals to motivate ourselves to drop the weight, boost our incomes, or whatever will lead us to our goal.

The more I thought about it, the more I realized the same thing can apply to writing a book. We

can think about the smaller pieces (the outline) all we want. But it doesn’t mean anything unless we know what the result will be. Where is the story going? What is the point?

We know that we can be more successful if we have a vision in mind of what success looks like. By the same token, we can be more successful if we have a vision of what our book looks like. What’s the ending? What’s the purpose?

I’ve written about this quite a bit recently, and I call it “visualizing Point B”.  In other words, if you have a destination in mind, whether a trip, a goal, or in this case a completed book, before you start on your journey, you need to know where you’re going… getting from Point A (where you are now) to Point B (where you want to end up).

Now, I want you to think about the book you need to write.

If fiction: Set a timer for 10 minutes and brainstorm your ending. Where will your characters be by the end? You may know how the book will start or who will be in it, but how will it end? Have fun as you brainstorm. No idea is too crazy.

Then, go through and choose the ideal ending from what you’ve brainstormed– choose the one that stands out to you the most.

The pieces of your outline should now fall into place when you go to create the rest of the outline and start to write. You know where you’re going, so it’s much easier to map your course for getting there.

If nonfiction: The process is a bit different with non-fiction, of course, because you’re not really coming up with an ending. In a non-fiction book, the ending generally summarizes everything the book contained. You try to inspire people and get them thinking, caught up in what they’ve just learned or felt.

Go ahead and write that ending section now (it only has to be a few paragraphs for this exercise) You have your ending, so now you can easily work toward it– it’s a more freeing way of outlining. Sure, you may not know everything that will go into your book yet and you may never actually use this “ending.” But, it will relieve your mind of the duty of thinking as you write, leaving room for creativity and solid writing.

This is a mind trick as much as an organizational trick. We all want to get to the end, right? Writers don’t like to write; they like to have written (a spin-off of Michael Kanin’s, “I don’t like to write, but I love to have written”). Well, you’re at the end already. Your mind is at ease and you’re ready to put the rest of the pieces in place.

This isn’t to say that you can never change your ending. Your story will tell you where to go. The point is that you now have direction and you don’t have to think about it. You can be as creative and free because the pressure of “the perfect ending” is gone.

Find all 10  Writing Cheats at: http://bringoutthepotential.com/2017/10/03/writing-amazing-kindle-books-with-these-10-easy-cheats/

50 Journalling Tips

Journaling is a fun and rewarding way to document the life’s happenings. It helps one to understand who they were then, who they are now and who they want to be in the future. Journaling can help a person find answers and insight to things affecting their lives. It can help them clear their mind of struggles, savor their accomplishments and much, much more.

If you’ve considered taking up journaling, keep these tips in mind.

  1. Journal daily for best results. This allows you to document things in much more detail.
  2. You don’t have to write a novel, just a few sentences will do.
  3. Journal when your mind is at ease so you can focus. This may be first thing in the morning, during your lunch break or the last thing you do at night.
  4. Record more than just your thoughts. Include your feelings, the sights, sounds and smells around you. What color was the sky? Did you smell fresh cut grass? What was the person wearing?
  5. Write about where you are in life at this moment.
  6. Write about how you got to this moment in life and where you see yourself going from here.
  7. Don’t worry about using correct grammar, full sentences or punctuation. This is for your eyes only. Just let the thoughts flow.
  8. Don’t censor your thoughts or feelings. Just write it as you see, think or feel it.
  9. Create a gratitude journal for all the things you are grateful for. When you’re feeling lost or down, read through it to brighten your day.
  10. Include more than just words. Photos, drawings, stickers, poems, quotes, scriptures, mementos and more can be added.
  11. Journal about your successes and failures. It will bring you much insight.
  12. When trying to solve a problem, write it down in third person so you see it from a new perspective.
  13. Don’t just surface write. Tap into your deeper emotions and thoughts to get the most benefit for your efforts.
  14. Pen and paper are much more effective for journaling than using digital devices.
  15. If pen and paper just doesn’t work for you, then go the digital route. It’s better than not journaling at all.
  16. Set limits, at least at first. Start with 2 minutes or one page and work your way to the point where you feel most comfortable. Once you get into a groove, aim for 10-15 minutes of journaling but again, do what feels right for you.
  17. Do not edit. The whole point in journaling is to explore your mind and document your thoughts. Editing stops the natural flow of things.
  18. Add a memorable title and date to each entry.
  19. Keep your journal in a secure location to ease your mind about writing private things.
  20. Journal in the same location every day. This might be your dining room table, your bed or your favorite coffee shop.
  21. Leave room for a table of contents. Once your journal is complete, you can add it at that time. This will allow you to quickly find what you are looking for.
  22. If you struggle to journal, try a different method. If you’re currently using an app, see if pen and paper will work better. Change the time or location you journal to see if that helps.
  23. Make a list of writing prompts to help when you feel you have nothing to write about.
  24. If you are short on time, make note of the most important details and come back to finish the writing later.
  25. Take your journal everywhere you go. You never know when an inspiring thought will come.
  26. Journal about anything that is important to you; people, places, ideas, books, poetry, etc.
  27. Add new words to your journal. Select a word and see if you can use it in your journal for the day.
  28. If necessary, great a starter phrase and use it time and again. “It all started….”
  29. Get creative. Add fun, silly thoughts to your journal. You don’t always have to be serious.
  30. No matter how you feel, write every day. Write when you’re sick, when you’re happy, when your sad, when you’re tired or hung over.
  31. Are you working towards something big? If so, document your progress.
  32. Use your journal to plan future events. Planning a vacation? Getting married?
  33. Document your goals, if you have any and your progress as you work towards them.
  34. Record details such conversations, time, date, location, the weather, your mood, your reactions to something and more.
  35. Use your journal to document your bucket list(s).
  36. Journal about things that make you feel good or feel bad.
  37. Journal about your most secret thoughts and ideas.
  38. Journal about others in your life; your friends, family, co-workers, pets, etc.
  39. Document lessons you’ve learned.
  40. Journal about the dreams you have at night as well as your dreams and aspirations.
  41. Never miss more than a few days of journaling at one time. It could create a stall that might last much longer.
  42. Keep your journal within sight so you can write things down as they come to you.
  43. Become one with nature. Grab your journal and take a walk. Stop somewhere safe and quiet to document the sights and sounds you hear and see.
  44. Before you start writing, relax and breathe deep. Clear your mind to everything except what you plan to write about at that moment.
  45. Use a timer if necessary to take the pressure of having to write off your shoulders.
  46. When trying to solve a problem, consider the outcomes of each scenario. If that happens, then what? If it doesn’t happen, what then? If it happens another way, how will that affect things? How likely is this to happen?
  47. At times, you may want to conduct a total mind dump. When this happens just start writing. Don’t worry if it makes sense, just write everything that comes to mind. You’ll feel like a new person getting those thoughts off of your mind and you can explore individual pieces of the mind dump at a later time if you feel like it.
  48. Consider writing “Top Ten” lists. “Top 10 Things I Worry About”, “Top 10 Things I Love About Myself” and so forth.
  49. Don’t forget to include perspective. Consider allows you to consider things from a different point of view. This may be reflecting back on past things, considering how another person feels or imagining how things might look, feel or be different in the future.
  50. Be authentic. Journaling is for your own well being. Don’t be scared to share your core values, your joy and love, your spirituality, creativity, fears, likes and dislikes.

 

Capturing the moment in the written form has so many benefits to your mind and body. If you journal regularly and truthfully, it can literally change your life.

Writing A Book Series In 3 Fast and Easy Steps

My friend and mentor, Kristen Joy (The Book Ninja), helped me so much to get my new book series out
“Bring Out The Potential Of Our Children”

I was totally over joyed when she told me I can pass on her simple easy to follow process.

She gave me this FREE Guide “Writing A Book Series In 3 Fast and Easy Steps”
to pass on to anyone who might benefit from it.

If that is you
Download your copy NOW Click Here – http://www.downloadmypdf.com/171/Tresea/BookSeriesin3StepsFINAL.pdfries,n

If you are like me and tend to procrastinate or lose focus
Why not join me and Kristen in the “Book Writing Challenge”

Where you’ll get the motivation to keep going on your book even if you tend to get distracted or feel like giving up?

How would you like to finally reach your writing goals and get your book published and in your hands before the end of the year?

How would it feel to finally create your book in the next 6 months?

Finally finish that heart-want book you’ve been wanting to write for so long?

Now’s the time for you TO DO ALL OF THE ABOVE IN THIS BOOK WRITING CHALLENGE!

ACT NOW and you can SAVE $200 with the Super Early Bird discount!!

==> BookWritingChallenge.com (Use promo code “challenge” without the quotes for $200 off!)

Challenge Start in 5 Days – May 5th

Get signed up and I’ll see you in the private Facebook Group and LIVE Group Writing Sessions

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